Reconstructive Microsurgery – Enabling Hand and Limb Replanting

Reconstructive Microsurgery pic
Reconstructive Microsurgery
Image: microsurg.org

Based in Augusta, Maine, Anthony Perrone, MD, provides care that spans general and plastic surgery. Dr. Anthony Perrone’s training in the field includes a hand and microsurgery fellowship undertaken at Harvard University and Massachusetts General Hospital.

An advanced surgical field, reconstructive microsurgery involves the use of highly specialized microscopes with the capacity to guide operations within tiny structures. The microscopes enlarge the physician’s view up to 50 times, which enables the use of precision instrumentation in confined spaces. Common uses of the microscopes, which facilitate stitches finer than a single human hair, include repairing nerves and blood vessels that have been transected.

The ability to reestablish blood flow between tiny severed nerves and vessels has had an outsized impact over the past half century. Since the early 1960s, severed limbs, toes, and fingers have been successfully replanted. The discipline has been augmented in recent years with new robotics and computing technologies.

Conditions That May Benefit from Reconstructive Hand Surgery

Anthony Perrone
Anthony Perrone MD

After earning his MD, Dr. Anthony Perrone went on to complete his preliminary training certification in general surgery at the University of Rochester’s Strong Memorial Hospital. Anthony Perrone, MD, was formerly a plastic surgeon at the Tufts University, Tufts Medical Center, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery in Boston, Massachusetts.

Hand surgery is a common form of plastic reconstructive surgery that is performed to improve strength, flexibility, and function. It is employed to treat conditions that cause pain or prevent normal hand functions.

Carpal tunnel syndrome is one condition that can often require hand surgery. Caused by a pinched median nerve in the wrist, carpal tunnel syndrome is characterized by numbness or tingling in the arm and hand. Several factors can contribute to this condition, including the structure of the wrist, underlying health problems, and routine work.

Rheumatoid arthritis is another condition that may be correctable by surgery. Rheumatoid arthritis is defined as the inflammation of any joint in the body. When it is present in the hands, it may result in deformation and immobilization.

Another condition that may be repairable through surgery is Dupuytren’s contracture, and it occurs when scar-like tissue forms in the palm and reaches into the fingers. It can bend the fingers into abnormal positions and reduce dexterity.

The Rho Chi Society’s Clinical Research Scholarship

Rho Chi Society  pic
Rho Chi Society
Image: rhochi.org

Now serving as the chief plastic surgeon at Maine General Medical Center, Anthony Perrone, MD, provides reconstructive surgeries to patients who have experienced injury, oncologic surgery, and congenital issues. Prior to beginning his career, Anthony Perrone, MD, studied at Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences. It was here that Dr. Perrone was named the president of the university’s chapter of the Rho Chi National Pharmacy Honor Society.

Each year, the Rho Chi Society awards its Clinical Research Scholarship of $7,500 to a clinical research fellow who meets the scholarship’s application requirements:

1. Be a Rho Chi Honor Society member.

2. Be a citizen of the United States or permanent resident.

3. Be a clinical research fellow who is preparing to enter the second year of fellowship.

4. Have completed her or his studies at a college of pharmacy or school that is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE).